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A single-item global job satisfaction measure is associated with quantitative blood immune indices in white-collar employees.

Authors
Nakata-A; Irie-M; Takahashi-M
Source
Ind Health 2013 Mar; 51(2):193-201
NIOSHTIC No.
20042541
Abstract
Although a single-item job satisfaction measure has been shown to be reliable and inclusive as multiple-item scales in relation to health, studies including immunological data are few. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of single-item job and family life satisfaction based on its association with immune indices. A total of 189 white-collar employees (70% men) underwent a blood draw for the measurement of natural killer (NK), total T, and B cell counts as well as plasma immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentrations and completed single-item job and family life satisfaction measures, respectively. The response options for satisfaction measures were 'dissatisfied' (coded 1) to 'satisfied' (coded 4). Spearman's partial correlations controlling for cofactors revealed that increased job satisfaction was positively associated with NK cells (r(sp)=0.201, p=0.007) and IgG (r(sp)=0.178, p=0.018), while family life satisfaction was unrelated to immune indices. Those who reported a combination of low job/low family life satisfaction had significantly lower NK and higher B cell counts than those with a high job/high family life satisfaction. Our study suggests that the single-item summary measure of job satisfaction, but not family life satisfaction, may be a valid tool to evaluate immune status in healthy white-collar employees.
Keywords
Worker-health; Work-environment; Industrial-environment; Job-analysis; Job-stress; Immunological-tests; Immunodiagnosis; Families; Immune-reaction; Men; Women; Mental-health; Blood-samples; Blood-tests; Blood-plasma; Immunoglobulins; Attitude; Cellular-reactions; Cell-alteration; Psychological-adaptation; Psychological-responses; Author Keywords: job satisfaction; family life satisfaction; single-item; immune system; worker; occupational health psychology; psychoimmunology; work condition
Contact
Akinori Nakata, PhD, School of Health Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, 807-8555, Japan
CODEN
INHEAO
Publication Date
20130301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
nakataa-tky@umin.ac.jp
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B20130520
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0019-8366
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Services
Source Name
Industrial Health
State
OH
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