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Predictors of dermal exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds among asphalt paving workers.

Authors
Cavallari-J; Herrick-R; Osborn-L; Kriech-A; Snawder-J; Olsen-L; McClean-M
Source
Dermatitis 2011 Sep; 22(5):288
NIOSHTIC No.
20042496
Abstract
Objectives: To identify the sources and work practices that affect dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC,) among asphalt paving workers. Methods: Twelve workers were monitored for 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Two weeks were under normal conditions with regard to dermal exposures. In the third week, biodiesel was substituted for diesel oil as a cleaning agent, and in the fourth week, workers were supplied dermal protection (gloves, neck cloth, clean long shirts and pants). Dermal exposure to PACs was quantified by a passive organic dermal (POD) sampler specifically developed for this study and a sunflower oil hand wash (HW) technique. Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate predictors of PAC exposures. Results; Dermal exposures were low such that most analytes were rarely detected above the LOD, with the exception of phenanthrene (Phen) and pyrene (Pyr). The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of Phen were 0.69 ng/cm2 on the POD sample and 1.37 ng/cm2 in the HW sample. GM concentrations of Pyr were 0.30 ng/cm2 on the POD sample and 0.29 ng/cm2 in the HW sample. Increasing frequency of glove use was associated with significant reductions in exposure (p < .0001) that ranged from 40 to 90% by analyte and method. Similar reductions in HW Phen (p = .01) and Pyr (p = .003) concentrations were observed when biodiesel was substituted for diesel oil. Higher asphalt temperatures were found to significantly increase exposure (p '" .01). Conclusion: Reductions in dermal exposure to PACs among pavers can be achieved with increased dermal coverage and substituting biodiesel for diesel oil as a cleaning agent. Additional reductions may be possible by decreasing the application temperature of asphalt. This study was sponsored by the National Asphalt Paving Association (NAPA), and the State Asphalt Paving Associations (SAPA).
Keywords
Work-practices; Skin-exposure; Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Construction-workers; Asphalt-cements; Asphalt-concretes; Sampling; Diesel-emissions; Oil-dermatitis; Oils; Cleaning-compounds; Gloves; Hand-protection; Exposure-assessment; Mathematical-models; Exposure-levels; Temperature-effects
CAS No.
85-01-8; 129-00-0
Publication Date
20110901
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1710-3568
NIOSH Division
DART
Source Name
Dermatitis
State
MA; IN; OH
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