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Neurologic symptoms associated with cattle farming in the Agricultural Health Study.

Authors
Vegosen-L; Davis-MF; Silbergeld-E; Breysse-PN; Agnew-J; Gray-G; Freeman-LB; Kamel-F
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2012 Oct; 54(10):1253-1258
NIOSHTIC No.
20042404
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Infection with Campylobacter jejuni, a bacterium carried by poultry and livestock, is the most frequently identified antecedent to the autoimmune neurologic condition Guillain-Barré Syndrome. We used Agricultural Health Study data to assess whether cattle farming was associated with prevalence of neurologic symptoms. METHODS: Prevalence of self-reported symptoms in cattle farmers (n = 8878) was compared with farmers who did not work with animals (n = 7462), using multivariate regression. RESULTS: Prevalence of numbness and weakness were increased for beef and dairy farmers compared with the reference group (P < 0.0001). Of cattle farmers, 48% did not report raising other animal species, and prevalence of numbness and weakness were also increased in this subgroup compared with the reference group (P < 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure to cattle was associated with increased prevalence of self-reported symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy.
Keywords
Infection-control; Bacteria; Poultry; Livestock; Neurological-system; Neurological-diseases; Neurological-reactions; Agricultural-workers; Workers; Agricultural-industry; Agriculture; Statistical-analysis; Epidemiology
Contact
Leora Vegosen, MHS, 615 N Wolfe Street, Room, W7034G, Baltimore, MD 21205
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20121001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
lvegosen@jhsph.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1076-2752
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
MD; FL; NC
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University - Baltimore
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