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Trends in the disproportionate burden of work-related traumatic injuries sustained by Latinos.

Authors
Sears-JM; Bowman-SM; Silverstein-BA
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2012 Oct; 54(10):1239-1245
NIOSHTIC No.
20042402
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Disproportionate occupational injury rates for Latinos are well documented, but there is limited information about whether disparity is increasing over time. This study describes trends in the burden of work-related traumatic injuries sustained by Latinos in Washington State. METHODS: Washington State Trauma Registry data from 1998 to 2008 were used to model annual change in the odds that a work-related traumatic injury was sustained by a Latino, controlling for demographics, injury-related factors, and Latino representation in the underlying labor force. RESULTS: We found a 5% mean annual increase in the odds that a comparable work-related traumatic injury was sustained by a Latino (P = 0.007). Falls in industrial/mine/quarry locations were the strongest contributor to increasing disparity. CONCLUSIONS: Latinos bear an increasingly disproportionate burden of occupational injuries and are less likely to have health insurance coverage aside from workers' compensation.
Keywords
Injuries; Sociological-factors; Humans; Men; Women; Traumatic-injuries; Models; Demographic-characteristics; Fall-protection; Statistical-analysis; Biological-factors; Epidemiology; Biological-factors; Age-groups
Contact
Jeanne M. Sears, PhD, MS, RN, Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Box 354809, Seattle, WA 98195
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20121001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
jeannes@u.washington.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-009883
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1076-2752
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
MD; WA
Performing Organization
University of Washington, Seattle
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