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Promoting integrated approaches to reducing health inequities among low-income workers: applying a social ecological framework.

Authors
Baron-SL; Beard-S; Davis-LK; Delp-L; Forst-L; Kidd-Taylor-A; Liebman-AK; Linnan-L; Punnett-L; Welch-LS
Source
Am J Ind Med 2014 May; 57(5):539-556
NIOSHTIC No.
20042383
Abstract
Background: Nearly one of every three workers in the United States is low-income. Low-income populations have a lower life expectancy and greater rates of chronic diseases compared to those with higher incomes. Low-income workers face hazards in their workplaces as well as in their communities. Developing integrated public health programs that address these combined health hazards, especially the interaction of occupational and non-occupational risk factors, can promote greater health equity. Methods: We apply a social-ecological perspective in considering ways to improve the health of the low-income working population through integrated health protection and health promotion programs initiated in four different settings: the worksite, state and local health departments, community health centers, and community-based organizations. Results: Examples of successful approaches to developing integrated programs are presented in each of these settings. These examples illustrate several complementary venues for public health programs that consider the complex interplay between work-related and non work-related factors, that integrate health protection with health promotion and that are delivered at multiple levels to improve health for low-income workers. Conclusions: Whether at the workplace or in the community, employers, workers, labor and community advocates, in partnership with public health practitioners, can deliver comprehensive and integrated health protection and health promotion programs. Recommendations for improved research, training, and coordination among health departments, health practitioners, worksites and community organizations are proposed.
Keywords
Workers; Humans; Men; Women; Diseases; Hazards; Risk-factors; Public-health; Health-hazards; Sociological-factors; Sociology; Health-programs; Training; Education; Total-Worker-Health; Surveillance-programs; Author Keywords: health inequities; low-income workers; total worker health; disparities
Contact
Sherry L. Baron, MD, MPH, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, R-17, Cincinnati, OH 25226
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20140501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
slb8@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-009850; B20130416
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
OH; NC; MA; CA; MD; NC
Performing Organization
University of Illinois
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