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Distribution and systemic effects of intranasally administered 25 nm silver nanoparticles in adult mice.

Authors
Genter-MB; Newman-NC; Shertzer-HG; Ali-SF; Bolon-B
Source
Toxicol Pathol 2012 Oct; 40(7):1004-1013
NIOSHTIC No.
20042223
Abstract
Previous work indicates that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) given IP to mice alter the regulation of inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes in brain. Here we assessed the distribution and toxic potential of AgNP following intranasal (IN) exposure. Adult male C57BL/6J mice received 25-nm AgNP (100 or 500 mg/kg) once IN. After 1 or 7 days, histopathology of selected organs was performed, and tissue reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were measured as an indicator of oxidative stress. Aggregated AgNP were found in spleen, lung, kidney, and nasal airway by routine light microscopy. Splenic AgNP accumulation was greatest in red pulp and occurred with modestly reduced cellularity and elevated hemosiderin deposition. Aggregated AgNP were not associated with microscopic changes in other tissues except for nasal mucosal erosions. Autometallography revealed AgNP in olfactory bulb and the lateral brain ventricles. Neither inflammatory cell infiltrates nor activated microglia were detected in brains of AgNP-treated mice. Elevated tissue GSH levels was observed in nasal epithelia (both doses at 1 day, 500 mg/kg at 7 days) and blood (500 mg/kg at 7 days). Therefore, IN administration of AgNP permits systemic distribution, produces reversible oxidative stress in the nose and in blood, and mildly enhances macrophage-mediated erythrocyte destruction in the spleen.
Keywords
Nanotechnology; Air-contamination; Pollution; Animals; Oxidative-processes; Exposure-levels; Laboratory-animals; Brain-matter; Pathology; Erythrocytes; Immunology; Drugs; Cellular-reactions; Mucous-membranes; Nasal-cavity; Silver-compounds; Author Keywords: silver; nanoparticles; intranasal instillation; spleen; glutathione; autometallography
Contact
Dr. Mary Beth Genter, Department of Environmental Health and Center for Environmental Genetics, University of Cincinnati, ML 670056, 3223 Eden Ave., 144 Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267
CODEN
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CAS No.
70-18-8
Publication Date
20121001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
marybeth.genter@uc.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008432
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0192-6233
Source Name
Toxicologic Pathology
State
OH
Performing Organization
University of Cincinnati
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