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Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis.

Authors
Kreiss-K
Source
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2013 Apr; 13(2):167-172
NIOSHTIC No.
20042200
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: New literature from 2009 to 2012 regarding occupational constrictive bronchiolitis challenges textbook descriptions of this disease, formerly thought to be limited to fixed airflow limitation arising in the wake of accidental overexposure to noxious chemicals. Indolent evolution of dyspnea without a recognized hazardous exposure is a more common presentation. RECENT FINDINGS: Biopsy-confirmed case series of constrictive bronchiolitis from US soldiers, Iranian survivors of sulfur mustard gassing, hospital-based studies, and flavoring-related cases document that indolent constrictive bronchiolitis cases can have normal spirometry or either restrictive or obstructive abnormalities. High-resolution computerized tomography studies can be normal or reflect air-trapping and mosaic attenuation on expiratory films. Thus, in the absence of noninvasive abnormalities, the diagnosis in dyspneic patients may require thoracoscopic biopsy in settings in which exposure risk has not been recognized. Many workers with occupational constrictive bronchiolitis stabilize with cessation of exposures causing bronchiolar epithelial necrosis. SUMMARY: Clinicians need a high index of suspicion for constrictive bronchiolitis in young patients with rapidly progressing exertional dyspnea, regardless of spirometric and radiologic findings. Identification of novel causes and exposure-response relations for known causes are needed to provide guidance for protecting workers at risk for this largely irreversible lung disease.
Keywords
Airway-obstruction; Respiratory-system-disorders; Respiratory-irritants; Pulmonary-function; Pulmonary-system; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Pulmonary-disorders; Hazards; Inhalants; Workers; Food-additives; Food-processing-workers; Food-processing; Food-processing-industry; Spirometry; Vapors; Exposure-levels; Toxic-effects; Toxic-vapors; Lung-disease; Lung; Lung-function; Lung-irritants; Lung-disorders; Military-personnel; Sulfur-compounds; Author Keywords: bronchiolitis obliterans; constrictive bronchiolitis; diacetyl; flavorings; sulfur mustard
Contact
Kathleen Kreiss, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, M/S H2800, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
CODEN
COACCS
CAS No.
7704-34-9
Publication Date
20130401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
KKreiss@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B20130306
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1528-4050
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
State
WV
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