Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Nanotechnology: toxicologic pathology.

Authors
Hubbs-AF; Sargent-LM; Porter-DW; Sager-TM; Chen-BT; Frazer-DG; Castranova-V; Sriram-K; Nurkiewicz-TR; Reynolds-SH; Battelli-LA; Schwegler-Berry-D; McKinney-W; Fluharty-KL; Mercer-RR
Source
Toxicol Pathol 2013 Feb; 41(2):395-409
NIOSHTIC No.
20042185
Abstract
Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies.
Keywords
Nanotechnology; Engineering; Molecular-structure; Medical-sciences; Toxicology; Pathology; Therapeutic-agents; Toxic-effects; Particulates; Author Keywords: toxicologic pathology; mechanisms of toxicity; microscopy techniques; pharmaceutical development/products; risk identification; safety assessment
Contact
Ann F. Hubbs, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1095 Willowdale Rd, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
TOPADD
Publication Date
20130201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ahubbs@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B20130221
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0192-6233
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Toxicologic Pathology
State
WV
TOP