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Comparison of opioid-related deaths by work-related injury.

Authors
Cheng-M; Sauer-B; Johnson-E; Porucznik-C; Hegmann-K
Source
Am J Ind Med 2013 Mar; 56(3):308-316
NIOSHTIC No.
20042032
Abstract
Objective: To infer whether work-related injuries may impact opioid-related deaths. Methods: Descriptive comparisons were done using data from the Utah Department of Health, the Office of Medical Examiners, and the Labor Commission on all Utah residents who died from opioid-related deaths from 2008 to 2009. Results: The majority of decedents (145 of 254, 57%) had at least one prior work-related injury. Demographics were similar regardless of work injury status. However, lack of high school diploma (18% vs. 7%, P < 0.001), prevalence of mental illness (50% vs. 15%, P < 0.001), tobacco (61% vs. 12%, P < 0.001), alcohol (87% vs. 28%, P < 0.001), and illicit drug (50% vs. 4%, P < 0.001) use were all substantially higher than the background population. Conclusion: A detailed history and screening for mental illness and substance abuse, including tobacco use, among injured workers may be helpful in avoiding potential opioid-related deaths.
Keywords
Injuries; Workers; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Drug-abuse; Drugs; Pharmaceuticals; Poison-control; Narcotics; Author Keywords: opioids; opioid related deaths; prescription drug overdose; workers; work-related injury
Contact
Melissa Cheng, MD, MHS, MOH, 391 Chipeta Way Suite C, Salt Lake City, UT 84108
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20130301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
melissa.cheng@hsc.utah.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-CCT-810426; B20130124
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
UT
Performing Organization
Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
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