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Work schedules and stress among health professionals.

Authors
Geiger-Brown-J; Rogers-VE; Trinkoff-AM; Selby-V
Source
Handbook of stress and burnout in health care, 3rd edition, Halbesleben JRB, ed., NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2008 Jan; :127-140
NIOSHTIC No.
20041999
Abstract
Adverse work schedules are common for health care workers (HeWs). By necessity, they provide around-the-clock coverage, thus shiftwork is often an unavoidable component of the work schedule. In addition to shift work, extended work shifts, quick returns or a break of only 8 hours when changing from one shift to another, mandatory overtime, on-call, and working without breaks are common to maintain staffing levels among registered nurses (RNs). Physicians also have severely extended workdays during their training years. The effect of these schedules is often physical and mental fatigue, which has both short- and longterm effects on the health and safety of HeWs, as well as consequences for patient safety. This chapter will describe the relationship between work schedules and adverse outcomes in HeWs, including the role of both person and system factors in moderating the scheduling effects, and will describe the role of sleep as the critical mechanism for reducing the impact of adverse work schedules on outcomes.
Keywords
Medical-personnel; Health-care-personnel; Workers; Work-environment; Humans; Men; Women; Shift-work; Shift-workers; Nurses; Nursing; Training; Mental-fatigue; Mental-stress; Fatigue; Physical-reactions; Safety-measures; Sleep-deprivation; Psychological-fatigue; Age-groups
Publication Date
20080101
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Editors
Halbesleben JRB
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9781604565003
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R21-OH-008392; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-008460
Source Name
Handbook of stress and burnout in health care
State
MD; NY
Performing Organization
University of Maryland - Baltimore
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