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Maternal occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and congenital heart defects among offspring in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

Authors
Lupo-PJ; Symanski-E; Langlois-PH; Lawson-CC; Malik-S; Gilboa-SM; Lee-LJ; Agopian-AJ; Desrosiers-TA; Waters-MA; Romitti-PA; Correa-A; Shaw-GM; Mitchell-LE; National Birth Defects Prevention Study
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 2012 Nov; 94(11):875-881
NIOSHTIC No.
20041945
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is evidence in experimental model systems that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) results in congenital heart defects (CHDs); however, to our knowledge, this relationship has not been examined in humans. Therefore, we conducted a case-control study assessing the association between estimated maternal occupational exposure to PAHs and CHDs in offspring. METHODS: Data on CHD cases and control infants were obtained from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study for the period of 1997 to 2002. Exposure to PAHs was assigned by industrial hygienist consensus, based on self-reported maternal occupational histories from 1 month before conception through the third month of pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between maternal occupational PAH exposure and specific CHD phenotypic subtypes among offspring. RESULTS: The prevalence of occupational PAH exposure was 4.0% in CHD case mothers (76/1907) and 3.6% in control mothers (104/2853). After adjusting for maternal age, race or ethnicity, education, smoking, folic acid supplementation, and study center, exposure was not associated with conotruncal defects (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-1.67), septal defects (AOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.86-1.90), or with any isolated CHD subtype. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings do not support an association between potential maternal occupational exposure to PAHs and various CHDs in a large, population-based study. For CHD phenotypic subtypes in which modest nonsignificant associations were observed, future investigations could be improved by studying populations with a higher prevalence of PAH exposure and by incorporating information on maternal and fetal genotypes related to PAH metabolism.
Keywords
Models; Exposure-levels; Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Heart; Congenital-effects; Humans; Children; Cardiovascular-disease; Cardiovascular-function; Cardiovascular-system; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Prenatal-exposure; Pregnancy; Author Keywords: birth defects; congenital heart defects; epidemiology; maternal occupation; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Contact
Philip J. Lupo, University of Texas School of Public Health, 1200 Herman Pressler Drive, RAS 511, Houston, TX 77030
CODEN
BDRPBT
Publication Date
20121101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
Philip.J.Lupo@uth.tmc.edu
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Contract-200-2000-08018; B20130124
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1542-0752
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; DART
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology
State
TX; OH; AR; GA; NC; IA; MS; CA
Performing Organization
Battelle
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