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Wrist activity monitor counts are correlated with dynamic but not static assessments of arm elevation exposure made with a triaxial accelerometer.

Authors
Acuna-M; Karduna-AR
Source
Ergonomics 2012 Aug; 55(8):963-970
NIOSHTIC No.
20041930
Abstract
There is evidence in the literature of a link between workplace arm elevation exposure and atraumatic shoulder injuries. However, there are several methods that can be used to assess this exposure. The goal of the present study was to compare the outcomes of an activity monitor attached to the wrist and a triaxial accelerometer mounted on the humerus. Twenty-one workers wore both sensors over the course of a full workday. While the activity monitor data was not significantly correlated with any static humeral parameters, it was strongly correlated with all dynamic parameters. The use of a simple, commercially available activity monitor might offer an inexpensive alternative for the assessment of a large number of subjects over multiple workdays to determine the relationship between dynamic motion and occupation shoulder injuries in the future. Practitioner Summary: Arm overuse has been linked to occupation-related shoulder injuries. An activity monitor attached to the wrist and a triaxial accelerometer mounted on the humerus were compared in a field trial. The results demonstrate that, under certain conditions, a commercially available activity monitor might be a useful tool for exposure assessment.
Keywords
Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Exposure-levels; Workers; Work-areas; Injuries; Humans; Men; Women; Monitors; Motion-studies; Physiology; Physiological-effects; Physiological-factors; Physiological-function; Age-groups; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Cumulative-trauma; Author Keywords: shoulder; exposure; accelerometers; overuse injuries
Contact
Andrew R. Karduna, Department of Human Physiology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403
CODEN
ERGOAX
Publication Date
20120801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
karduna@uoregon.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008288; B20130124
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0014-0139
Source Name
Ergonomics
State
OR
Performing Organization
University of Oregon
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