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Exposure to triclosan augments the allergic response to ovalbumin in a mouse model of asthma.

Authors
Anderson-SE; Franko-J; Kashon-ML; Anderson-KL; Hubbs-AF; Lukomska-E; Meade-BJ
Source
Toxicol Sci 2013 Mar; 132(1):96-106
NIOSHTIC No.
20041820
Abstract
During the last decade there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. These studies were conducted to investigate the role of dermal exposure to triclosan, an endocrine-disrupting compound, on the hypersensitivity response to ovalbumin (OVA) in a murine model of asthma. Triclosan has had widespread use in the general population as an antibacterial and antifungal agent and is commonly found in consumer products such as soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, shaving creams, mouth washes, and cleaning supplies. For these studies, BALB/c mice were exposed dermally to concentrations of triclosan ranging from 0.75-3% (0.375-1.5 mg/mouse/day) for 28 consecutive days. Concordantly, mice were intraperitoneally injected with OVA (0.9 microg) and aluminum hydroxide (0.5 mg) on days 1 and 10 and challenged with OVA (125 microg) by pharyngeal aspiration on days 19 and 27. Compared to the animals exposed to OVA alone, increased spleen weights, OVA-specific IgE, Interleukin (IL)-13 cytokine levels, and numbers of lung eosinophils were demonstrated when mice were co-exposed to OVA and triclosan. Statistically significant increases in OVA-specific and non-specific airway hyperreactivity (AHR) were observed for all triclosan co-exposed groups when compared to the vehicle and OVA controls. In these studies exposure to triclosan alone was not demonstrated to be allergenic, however; co-exposure with a known allergen resulted in enhancement of the hypersensitivity response to that allergen, suggesting that triclosan exposure may augment the allergic responses to other environmental allergens.
Keywords
Toxicology; Bronchial-asthma; Laboratory-animals; Laboratory-techniques; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Pulmonary-function; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Lung-function; Dose-response; Lung-disorders; Lung-irritants; Respiratory-system-disorders; Skin-exposure; Endocrine-function; Endocrine-system; Hypersensitivity; Antibacterial-agents; Antifungals; Aluminum-compounds; Lung-cells; Allergens; Allergic-reactions; Analytical-models; Animal-studies; Laboratory-testing; Hypersensitivity; Cytotoxic-effects; Lung-irritants; Airway-resistance; Author Keywords: Triclosan; asthma; chemical Adjuvancy
Contact
Stacey E. Anderson, Ph.D, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 1095 Willowdale Drive, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
TOSCF2
CAS No.
21645-51-2; 3380-34-5
Publication Date
20130301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
Sanderson4@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B20121218D
ISSN
1096-6080
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Toxicological Sciences
State
WV
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