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Effect of chronic sallicylate treatment on age-related cochlear degeneration.

Authors
Chen-G-D; Li-M; Tanaka-C; Bielefeld-E; Kermany-MH; Salvi-R; Henderson-D
Source
Abstr 32nd Midwinter Res Meet 2009 Feb; 32:197
NIOSHTIC No.
20041699
Abstract
Salicylate (aspirin) is a widely used drug in clinics. Acute application of salicylate may cause reversible hearing loss, reduction of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), and loss of outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility. A long-term application may cause tinnitus. Interestingly, it has been reported that a long-term salicylate application up-regulated expression of prestin, the OHC motor protein, consequently leading to an increase of OHC electromotility and DPOAE. Salicylate has also been shown to have protective effect on ototoxicity induced by noise, cisplatin and gentamicin. In the current study, aging Fischer 344 rats (18 months old) were treated with sodium salicylate at a dose of 100 mg/kg for 2 times per day for 5 days per week for 3 weeks. DPOAE and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were recorded and compared before and after the treatment. The OHC-related cochlear functions including cochlear microphonics (CM) and cochear amplification were also determined. Finally, prestin levels in OHCs were examined immunohistochemically. It appeared that the treatment delayed some aging processes. This study was supported by NIOSH grant 1R01OH008113-01A1
Keywords
Noise-exposure; Exposure-levels; Noise-induced-hearing-loss; Noise-exposure; Noise; Hearing; Hearing-disorders; Hearing-loss; Laboratory-animals; Animals; Molecular-structure; Age-factors
Publication Date
20090214
Document Type
Abstract
Editors
Santi-PA
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003973; Grant-Number-R01-OH-008113
ISSN
0742-3152
Source Name
Abstracts of the 32nd Midwinter Research Meeting
State
MO; MD; NY
Performing Organization
Washington University, St. Louis
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