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Incidence and cost of depression after occupational injury.

Authors
Asfaw-A; Souza-K
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2012 Sep; 54(9):1086-1091
NIOSHTIC No.
20041481
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined if injured workers were more likely than noninjured workers to be treated for depression after an occupational injury and estimated the cost paid by group medical insurance. METHOD: Nearly 367,900 injured and noninjured workers were drawn from the 2005 Thomson Reuters MarketScan data. Descriptive, logistic, and two-part model regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The odds of injured workers being treated for depression within the study period were 45% higher than those of noninjured workers (95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.78). The unconditional average cost of outpatient depression treatment was 63% higher for injured workers than for noninjured workers. CONCLUSIONS: Injured workers were more likely than noninjured workers to suffer from depression during the study period. Consequently, additional costs are incurred for treating injured workers' depression; these costs were not covered by the workers' compensation system.
Keywords
Injuries; Mental-health; Mental-disorders; Psychological-adaptation; Psychological-effects; Mathematical-models; Statistical-analysis; Health-care; Medical-care; Outpatient-facilities; Humans; Psychological-disorders; Surveillance-programs
Contact
Abay Asfaw, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 395 E Street, SW, Washington, DC 20201
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20120901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
hqp0@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B09262012
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
1076-2752
NIOSH Division
OD; DSHEFS
Priority Area
Mining: Oil and Gas Extraction
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
DC
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