Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Benzene uptake among automobile mechanics: concentrations in exhaled breath using a self-administered sampling technique.

Authors
Egeghy-P; Nylander-Frency-L; Hertz-Picciotto-I; Rappaport-SM; Gwin-K
Source
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, June 2-7, 2001, New Orleans, Louisiana. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association, 2001 Jun; :33
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20041362
Abstract
Automobile mechanics constitute a large population of workers exposed to benzene, a known human carcinogen, through their contact with gasoline vapor and automobile exhaust. However, little has been reported on the benzene uptake associated with these exposures. We used self-administered monitoring, a technique which has been gaining popularity in exposure assessment, to repeatedly measure uptake (via benzene in exhaled breath) among 83 workers from 12 automobile repair garages in North Carolina. Post-exposure benzene concentrations in breath averaged 57 ug/m3 (SD = 157 ug/m3) with a range of <3.2 - 2,030 ug/m3. Preliminary analysis using mixed-effects statistical models yielded three significant predictors of benzene concentration in breath, namely, benzene exposure concentration (p < 0.0001), pre-exposure benzene concentration in breath (p = 0.0003), and smoking status (p = 0.0014). The within-person component comprised 97% of the total variance, indicating that environmental rather than interindividual differences were primarily responsible for the large variability in uptake. We validated the self breath measurements with expert measurements performed nearly concurrently on a subset of workers. The intraclass correlation coefficient for 63 pairs of breath samples was 0.70, indicating good agreement between the "self' and "expert" methods. This study demonstrates that self-administered monitoring can be efficiently used to measure biomarkers in exhaled breath.
Keywords
Exposure-levels; Benzenes; Breathing; Statistical-analysis; Smoking; Workers; Work-environment; Humans; Men; Women; Biomarkers; Carcinogens; Automotive-industry; Automobile-repair-shops
CAS No.
71-43-2
Publication Date
20010602
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2001
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, June 2-7, 2001, New Orleans, Louisiana
State
NC; OH
TOP