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Environmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and p,p'-DDE and sperm sex-chromosome disomy.

Authors
McAuliffe-ME; Williams-PL; Korrick-SA; Altshul-LM; Perry-MJ
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2012 Apr; 120(4):535-540
NIOSHTIC No.
20041247
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Chromosomal abnormalities contribute substantially to reproductive problems, but the role of environmental risk factors has received little attention. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the association of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) exposures with sperm sex-chromosome disomy. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 192 men from subfertile couples. We used multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 to determine XX, YY, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei. Serum was analyzed for concentrations of 57 PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE. Poisson regression models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for disomy by exposure quartiles, controlling for demographic characteristics and semen parameters. RESULTS: The median percent disomy was 0.3 for XX and YY, 0.9 for XY, and 1.6 for total sex-chromosome disomy. We observed a significant trend of increasing IRRs for increasing quartiles of p,p'-DDE in XX, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy, and a significant trend of increasing IRRs for increasing quartiles of PCBs for XY and total sex-chromosome disomy; however, there was a significant inverse association for XX disomy. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that exposure to p,p'-DDE may be associated with increased rates of XX, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy, whereas exposure to PCBs may be associated with increased rates of YY, XY, and total sex-chromosome disomy. In addition, we observed an inverse association between increased exposure to PCBs and XX disomy. Further work is needed to confirm these findings.
Keywords
Reproductive-system; Reproductive-system-disorders; Reproductive-effects; Men; Spermatogenesis; Spermatozoa; Chromosome-damage; Chromosome-disorders; Polychlorinated-biphenyls; Gene-mutation; Genes; Fertility; Employee-exposure; Environmental-exposure; Chlorodiphenyls; Ethylenes; Sex-factors; Author Keywords: aneuploidy; dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT); dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); disomy; endocrine disruptors; in situ hybridization; fluorescence; pesticides; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); reproduction; sperm
Contact
M.J. Perry, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, 2100 M Street NW, Suite 203, Washington, DC 20037 USA
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
11097-69-1; 72-55-9; 50-29-3
Publication Date
20120401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mperry@gwu.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416; B08142012
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
MA; DC
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
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