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Translations of the humerus in persons with shoulder impingement symptoms.

Authors
Ludewig-PM; Cook-TM
Source
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2002 Jun; 32(6):248-259
NIOSHTIC No.
20041047
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Two-group mixed-model analysis of covariance and correlation analysis. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether differences in humeral translations exist between patients with shoulder impingement symptoms and an asymptomatic comparison group, and if so, to determine if shoulder range-of-motion (ROM) measures are associated with abnormal translations. BACKGROUND: Abnormal translations of the humeral head are believed to reduce the available subacromial space and to contribute to the development or progression of shoulder impingement symptoms. These abnormal translations have also been theorized to be related to tightness of the posterior capsule and decreased shoulder ROM. METHODS AND MEASURES: Three-dimensional humeral translations were tracked in symptomatic construction workers and an asymptomatic comparison group while elevating the arm in the scapular plane under no-load, 2.3-kg, and 4.6-kg hand-load conditions. Between-group comparisons were made across 3 phases of motion (30 degrees-60 degrees, 60 degrees-90 degrees, and 90 degrees-120 degrees) and the association between humeral translations and cross-body adduction and shoulder internal rotation ROM measures were determined by Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS: Persons with shoulder symptoms demonstrated small but significant changes in anterior-posterior translations of the humerus. These changes for the 90 degrees-120 degrees phase of humeral elevation were moderately negatively associated with available cross-body adduction ROM. CONCLUSIONS: The identified kinematic deviations are consistent with possible reductions of the subacromial space. Further study of relationships between posterior capsule tightness, rotator cuff function, and abnormal humeral translations is warranted to better delineate underlying kinematic mechanisms that may contribute to shoulder impingement symptoms and to refine rehabilitation techniques.
Keywords
Biomechanics; Body-mechanics; Body-regions; Motion-studies; Physiological-effects; Physiological-function; Kinesiology; Physiopathology; Humans; Men; Age-groups; Analytical-instruments; Analytical-models; Electrophysiological-measurements; Physical-therapy; Physiological-measurements; Construction-workers; Injuries
Contact
Paula M. Ludewig, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, The University of Minnesota, MMC 388, 420 Delaware Street, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
CODEN
JOSPDV
Publication Date
20020601
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ludew001@umn.edu
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Construction
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-CCU-317202
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0190-6011
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
State
MN; MD
Performing Organization
The Center to Protect Workers' Rights
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