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The Upper Midwest Health Study: industry and occupation of glioma cases and controls.

Authors
Ruder-AM; Waters-MA; Carreón-T; Butler-MA; Calvert-GM; Davis-King-KE; Waters-KM; Schulte-PA; Mandel-JS; Morton-RF; Reding-DJ; Rosenman-KD; Brain Cancer Collaborative Study Group
Source
Am J Ind Med 2012 Sep; 55(9):747-755
NIOSHTIC No.
20041023
Abstract
Background: Understanding glioma etiology requires determining which environmental factors are associated with glioma. Upper Midwest Health Study case-control participant work histories collected 1995-1998 were evaluated for occupational associations with glioma. ''Exposures of interest'' from our study protocol comprise our a priori hypotheses. Materials and Methods: Year-long or longer jobs for 1,973 participants were assigned Standard Occupational Classifications (SOC) and Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC). The analysis file includes 8,078 SIC- and SOC-coded jobs. For each individual, SAS 9.2 programs collated employment with identical SIC-SOC coding. Distributions of longest ''total employment duration'' (total years worked in jobs with identical industry and occupation codes, including multiple jobs, and non-consecutive jobs) were compared between cases and controls, using an industrial hygiene algorithm to group occupations. Results Longest employment duration was calculated for 780 cases and 1,156 controls. More case than control longest total employment duration was in the "engineer, architect" occupational group [16 cases, 10 controls, odds ratio (OR) 2.50, adjusted for age group, sex, age and education, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-5.60]. Employment as a food processing worker [mostly butchers and meat cutters] was of borderline significance (27 cases, 21 controls, adjusted OR: 1.78, CI: 0.99-3.18). Conclusions: Among our exposures of interest work as engineers or as butchers and meat cutters was associated with increased glioma risk. Significant associations could be due to chance, because of multiple comparisons, but similar findings have been reported for other glioma studies. Our results suggest some possible associations but by themselves could not provide conclusive evidence.
Keywords
Job-analysis; Occupations; Etiology; Environmental-factors; Industrial-hygiene-programs; Mathematical-models; Statistical-analysis; Tumors; Occupational-exposure; Industrial-exposures; Engineering; Meat-handlers; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors
Contact
Avima M. Ruder, PhD, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Mailstop R-16, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20120901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
amr2@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B07092012
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; DART; EID
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
OH; MN; IA; WI; MI
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