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Utilization of immunochemical techniques to determine effects of vanadium exposure on oxidative damage to protein.

Authors
Keller-R
Source
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 20-24, 1996, Washington, DC. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association, 1996 May; :69-70
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20040977
Abstract
The development of immunochemical techniques has led to sensitive methods to monitor exposure. We have developed an immunochemical assay to detect carbonyl moieties that result from oxidative damage to proteins. Oxidative damage can occur from exposure to a variety of industrial chemicals. Vanadium, an occupational metal used in numerous processes including the hardening of steel and the manufacture of pigments, has been shown to lead to many toxic manifestations, primarily respiratory effects and renal damage. Recent studies have suggested that many adverse effects of vanadium exposure may be due to metal-catalyzed oxidative protein damage. This study utilizes immunochemical techniques to assess the ability of vanadium to damage tissue by oxidative mechanisms. To examine the effects of vanadium on protein damage. homogenates prepared from rodent pulmonary, renal, and hepatic tissue were exposed in vitro to varying (0-1.0 mM) vanadium concentrations. The resulting protein-derived carbonyls were reacted with 2,4dinitrophenylhydrazine giving the corresponding hydrazines, which wcre detected by Western blot using anti-dinitrophenyl antisera. Analysis of the Immunoblots using a densitometer indicated linear relationships between carbonyl group formation and increasing vanadium concentration in all tissue fractions studied. Further analysis of the immunoblots showed the appearance of the distinct bands, particularly in the pulmonary tissue, which demonstrated increased susceptibility of the specific proteins to oxidative damage. These results may aid in identifying biomarkers of exposure to industrial toxicants which indicate early oxidative protein damage.
Keywords
Pulmonary-system-disorders; Oxidative-processes; Respiratory-system-disorders; Lung-irritants; Immunology; Immunological-tests; Biological-monitoring; Antibody-response; Analytical-processes
CAS No.
7440-62-2
Publication Date
19960520
Document Type
Abstract
Funding Amount
64628
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1996
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-03061
Priority Area
Pulmonary System Disorders
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 20-24, 1996, Washington, DC
State
AR; DC
Performing Organization
University of Arkansas Med Scis Ltl Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas
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