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Provision and use of safety-engineered medical devices among home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina.

Authors
Leiss-JK
Source
Am J Infect Control 2010 Oct; 38(8):636-639
NIOSHTIC No.
20040916
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nurses who provide care in the home are at risk of blood exposure from needlesticks. Using safety-engineered medical devices reduces the risk of needlestick. The objectives of this study were to assess provision of safety devices by home care and hospice agencies as well as the use of these devices by home care and hospice nurses in North Carolina, and to examine the association between provision and use. METHODS: A mail survey was conducted among North Carolina home care and hospice nurses in 2006. RESULTS: The adjusted response rate was 69% (n = 833). The percentage of nurses who were always provided with safety devices ranged from 51% (blood tube holders) to 83% (winged steel needles). Ninety-five percent of nurses who were always provided with safety devices, but only 15%-50% of nurses who were not always provided with safety devices, used a safety device the last time they used that general type of device. Among nurses who did not use a safety device on that occasion, 60%-80% did not use it because it was not provided by the agency. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that limited access is the primary reason for home care/hospice nurses' failure to use safety devices. The policy goal of providing safety devices to health care workers in all situations in which such devices could reduce their risk of needlestick is not being achieved for home care nurses in North Carolina.
Keywords
Bloodborne-pathogens; Needlestick-injuries; Health-care-personnel; Nurses; Medical-care; Medical-equipment; Safety-engineering; Hospital-equipment; Health-care; Health-services; Personal-protective-equipment; Employee-exposure; Epidemiology; Health-surveys; Safety-practices; Risk-analysis; Injury-prevention; Safety-equipment; Protective-equipment; Protective-measures; Health-protection; Author Keywords: Blood exposure; epidemiology; home nursing; needlestick; occupational exposure; survey
Contact
Jack K. Leiss, PhD, Epidemiology Research Program, Cedar Grove Institute for Sustainable Communities, 6919 Lee St, Mebane, NC 27302
CODEN
AJICDC
Publication Date
20101001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
jackl@mcmoss.org
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008241
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0196-6553
Source Name
American Journal of Infection Control
State
NC
Performing Organization
Constella Group - Durham, North Carolina
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