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Detection of DNA damage in workers exposed to JP-8 jet fuel.

Authors
Krieg-EF Jr.; Mathias-PI; Toennis-CA; Clark-JC; Marlow-KL; B'Hymer-C; Singh-NP; Gibson-RL; Butler-MA
Source
Mutat Res Genet Toxicol Environ Mutagen 2012 Sep; 747(2):218-227
NIOSHTIC No.
20040849
Abstract
The genotoxicity of jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) was assessed in the leukocytes of archived blood specimens from U.S. Air Force personnel using the comet assay. No differences in mean comet assay measurements were found between low, moderate, and high exposure groups before or after a 4 hour work shift. Before the work shift, mean tail DNA and mean tail (Olive) moment increased as the concentration of benzene measured in end-exhaled breath increased, indicating that prior environmental or work-related exposures to benzene produced DNA damage. The number of cells with highly damaged DNA decreased as the pre-shift benzene concentration in breath increased. It is not clear why the decrease is occurring. Mean tail DNA and mean tail (Olive) moment decreased as the concentrations of benzene and naphthalene measured in breath immediately after the work shift increased. These inverse relationships may reflect a slower rate of absorption or a faster rate of expiration of benzene in the lung. The number of cells with highly damaged DNA increased as the concentration of urinary (2-methoxyethoxy)acetic acid (MEAA) increased. This relationship was not seen in urinary MEAA adjusted for creatinine. MEAA is a metabolite of the deicing agent 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol contained in JP-8. MEAA or a component of JP-8 correlated with MEAA may have a toxic effect on DNA.
Keywords
Jet-engine-fuels; Fuels; Military-personnel; Exposure-assessment; Genotoxic-effects; Genotoxicity; DNA-damage; Deoxyribonucleic-acids; Blood-samples; Leukocytes; Bioassays; Benzenes; Employee-exposure; Breathing; Cell-damage; Naphthalenes; Chemical-indicators; Absorption-rates; Acetic-acids; Ethanols
Contact
Edward F. Krieg Jr., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Applied Research and Technology, MS C-22, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
CODEN
MRGMFI
CAS No.
71-43-2; 91-20-3; 16024-56-9; 111-77-3
Publication Date
20120918
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
EKrieg@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B06202012
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1383-5718
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Healthcare and Social Assistance; Services
Source Name
Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
State
OH; WA; MD
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