Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Temperature dependency of burn-off emissions in the automobile industry.

Authors
Scott-KJ
Source
Temperature dependency of burn-off emissions in the automobile industry. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, 2008, May; :1-53
NIOSHTIC No.
20040818
Abstract
This work characterized burn-off emissions from automobiles. After an exhaustive literature review, engine temperatures were determined to reach a maximum temperature of approximately 110 deg. C, while exhaust system components reached a maximum temperature around 600 deg. C. Metal-drawing fluids were used to bend the exhaust system components during manufacturing. Because these components were not rinsed prior to incorporation into a vehicle, residues could be left on the surfaces. An experimental test chamber was constructed to conduct controlled testing of three metalworking fluids of various types to mimic real-world conditions. Real-time particle number measurements were made using a condensation particle counter and an optical particle counter. The temperature at which burn-off begins to occur was found to be around 120 to 150 deg. C. This burn-off was found to be an evaporation-condensation phenomenon when metalworking fluid residues vaporize and condense forming fine (0.1um to 2.5um) and ultrafine (<0.1um) aerosols. The temperature dependency of this phenomenon was observed to follow the Clausius-Clapeyron equation that states as temperature increases, vapor pressure increases. Most aerosol particles were observed to be in the range of less than 0.01um to approximately 2.0um.
Keywords
Particulates; Particulate-dust; Temperature-effects; Metalworking-fluids; Automotive-industry; Aerosols; Nanotechnology
Publication Date
20080501
Document Type
Dissertation
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008491
Source Name
Temperature dependency of burn-off emissions in the automobile industry
State
IA
Performing Organization
University of Iowa
TOP