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Myths and facts about falls in residential construction.

Authors
CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training
Source
Silver Spring, MD: CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, 2012 Apr; :1-2
NIOSHTIC No.
20040749
Abstract
Myth 1: Residential contractors don't get injured as badly as commercial construction workers. FACT: Half of all construction workers who have fallen to their death in Massachusetts worked in residential construction. Myth 2: You have to fall a long distance to kill yourself. FACT: If you hit your head hard enough, you can die from any height. Half the construction workers who died in a fall fell from a height of 25 feet or less. Even if you survive a fall, you may be laid up for some time with a disability. Myth 3: Experienced workers don't fall. FACT: The average age of construction workers who have fallen to their death was 43. These men had many years of experience. Myth 4: Fall protection equipment is more of a hindrance than a help. FACT: Nothing is more of a hindrance than a lifetime disability. Fall protection equipment is continually improving. Retractable lifelines allow for maximum flexibility. Roof anchors can be nailed into the structural members of wooden roofs. Myth 5: Working safely is costly. FACT: Some equipment isn't costly, such as ladder stabilizers, guardrail holders, and fall protection kits. Other items such as scaffolds are more expensive. Invest in this equipment, just as you would a quality tool. FACT: Falls can be prevented, plan ahead, bring the right equipment to the job, and use it correctly. Stay alert, always think first, and don't take risks. Watch out for others on the job. Train your workers, make sure that your employees know how to work safely at heights.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Construction-equipment; Fall-protection; Height-factors; Mortality-data; Mortality-rates; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Traumatic-injuries; Safety-education; Safety-measures; Work-environment; Work-practices; Personal-protective-equipment
Contact
The Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), 8484 Georgia Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Publication Date
20120401
Document Type
Other
Funding Type
Construction; Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307; B05222012
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
Myths and facts about falls in residential construction
State
MD; MA
Performing Organization
CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, Silver Spring, Maryland
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