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U.S. truck driver anthropometric study and multivariate anthropometric models for cab designs.

Authors
Guan-J; Hsiao-H; Bradtmiller-B; Kau-T-Y; Reed-MR; Jahns-SK; Loczi-J; Hardee-HL; Piamonte-DPT
Source
Hum Factors 2012 Oct; 54(5):849-871
NIOSHTIC No.
20040731
Abstract
Objective: This study presents data from a largescale anthropometric study of U.S. truck drivers and the multivariate anthropometric models developed for the design of next-generation truck cabs. Background: Up-to-date anthropometric information of the U.S. truck driver population is needed for the design of safe and ergonomically efficient truck cabs. Method: We collected 35 anthropometric dimensions for 1,950 truck drivers (1,779 males and 171 females) across the continental United States using a sampling plan designed to capture the appropriate ethnic, gender, and age distributions of the truck driver population. Results: Truck drivers are heavier than the U.S. general population, with a difference in mean body weight of 13.5 kg for males and 15.4 kg for females. They are also different in physique from the U.S. general population. In addition, the current truck drivers are heavier and different in physique compared to their counterparts of 25 to 30 years ago. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study provide more accurate anthropometric information for cab designs than do the current U.S. general population data or truck driver data collected 25 to 30 years ago. Multivariate anthropometric models, spanning 95% of the current truck driver population on the basis of a set of 12 anthropometric measurements, have been developed to facilitate future cab designs. Application: The up-to-date truck driver anthropometric data and multivariate anthropometric models will benefit the design of future truck cabs which, in turn, will help promote the safety and health of the U.S. truck drivers.
Keywords
Truck-drivers; Trucking; Humans; Men; Women; Weight-factors; Weight-measurement; Anthropometry; Ergonomics; Equipment-design; Author Keywords: truck driver; human body size; cab design models
Contact
Jinhua Guan, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Safety Research, 1095 Willowdale Rd., Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
HUFAA6
Publication Date
20121001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
ezg6@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B05102012
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0018-7208
NIOSH Division
DSR
Priority Area
Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities
Source Name
Human Factors
State
WV; OH; VA; MI; IN; OR; WA
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