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Environmental factors in cancer: radon.

Authors
Field-RW
Source
President's Cancer Panel, Charleston, South Carolina. Fletcher, NC: The American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists, 2008 Dec; :1-10
NIOSHTIC No.
20040690
Abstract
Over 50% of the average individual's radiation dose comes from exposure to radon decay products. Two of the radon decay products, Polonium-218 and Polonium-214, account for the majority of the radiation exposure to the lungs. Because we are building homes without radon resistant features faster than we are mitigating homes to reduce radon concentrations, more people are exposed to radon than ever before. Furthermore, the increased use of medical procedures and tests that utilize radiation has increased substantially. The consequence of this mounting radiation exposure for an individual is genomic instability and an increased potential for cancer. In the following paper, the generic term radon will be used to refer to radon and its decay products.
Keywords
Radiation; Exposure-levels; Exposure-limits; Lung-disease; Lung-disorders; Lung; Lung-function; Cancer; Humans; Men; Women; Pulmonary-cancer; Pulmonary-disorders; Pulmonary-system; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Risk-factors; Epidemiology; Toxins
Contact
R. William Field, Ph.D., M.S., Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
CAS No.
10043-92-2
Publication Date
20081204
Document Type
Other
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2009
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008491
Source Name
President's Cancer Panel, Charleston, South Carolina
State
IA; SC
Performing Organization
University of Iowa
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