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On the correlation between single-frequency impedance measurements and human skin permeability to water.

Authors
White-EA; Horne-A; Runciman-J; Orazem-ME; Navidi-WC; Roper-CS; Bunge-AL
Source
Toxicol In Vitro 2011 Dec; 25(8):2095-2104
NIOSHTIC No.
20040640
Abstract
The objective of this study was to quantitatively compare measurements of tritiated water permeability with impedance determined at either 100 or 1000 Hz using an LCR databridge on the same pieces of skin. A previously published expression based on a simple circuit of a parallel resistor and constant phase element (CPE) was used to relate (RPARA) measured at different frequencies to the DC resistance (RskinA) and the steady-state skin permeability of tritiated water (kp). Using this analysis, kp and (RPARA) data from three laboratories were shown to be consistent with each other, and kp and (RskinA) estimated from (RPARA) were linearly correlated. Compared with urea and mannitol, which are known to permeate skin through a polar pathway, the value of kp for water was found to be about two times larger than expected for transport through only the polar pathway, suggesting an approximately equal contribution from the lipophilic pathway. Equations relating kp to (RPARA) and (RskinA) were used to compare on a consistent basis proposed tests for identifying and excluding damaged skin from chemical absorption studies. The criterion of 20 kO cm2 for (RskinA) corresponds to a tritiated water permeability of 3.210(-3) cm/h, which should exclude damaged skin without screening undamaged but higher permeability skin samples from study.
Keywords
Age-groups; Humans; Men; Women; Skin; Skin-absorption; Absorption-rates; Metabolism; Water-sampling; Electrical-conductivity; Author Keywords: Electrical impedance spectroscopy; Skin barrier function; Stratum corneum; Skin integrity; In vitro; Constant phase element; Polar pathway; Tritiated water; Urea; Mannitol
Contact
Annette L. Bunge, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
CODEN
TIVIEQ
CAS No.
10028-17-8
Publication Date
20111201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
abunge@mines.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007493
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0887-2333
Source Name
Toxicology in Vitro
State
CO
Performing Organization
Colorado School of Mines
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