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Disturbance and recovery of trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours following prolonged trunk flexion: influences of duration and external load on creep-induced effects.

Authors
Bazrgari-B; Hendershot-B; Muslim-K; Toosizadeh-N; Nussbaum-MA; Madigan-ML
Source
Ergonomics 2011 Nov; 54(11):1043-1052
NIOSHTIC No.
20040585
Abstract
Trunk flexion results in adverse mechanical effects on the spine and is associated with a higher incidence of low back pain. To examine the effects of creep deformation on trunk behaviours, participants were exposed to full trunk flexion in several combinations of exposure duration and external load. Trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were obtained pre- and post-exposure and during recovery using sudden perturbations. Intrinsic trunk stiffness decreased with increasing flexion duration and in the presence of the external load. Recovery of intrinsic stiffness required more time than the exposure duration and was influenced by exposure duration. Reflexive trunk responses increased immediately following exposure but recovered quickly (~2.5 min). Alterations in reflexive trunk behaviour following creep deformation exposures may not provide adequate compensation to allow for complete recovery of concurrent reductions in intrinsic stiffness, which may increase the risk of injury due to spinal instability. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: An increased risk of low back injury may result from flexion-induced disturbances to trunk behaviours. Such effects, however, appear to depend on the type of flexion exposure, and have implications for the design of work involving trunk flexion.
Keywords
Back-injuries; Exposure-levels; Exposure-limits; Weight-factors; Risk-factors; Behavior; Humans; Men; Women; Neuromuscular-system; Neuromuscular-system-disorders; Author Keywords: low back pain; spine biomechanics; creep deformation; prolonged flexion; stiffness; reflex
Contact
Maury Nussbaum, Virginia Tech - Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061
CODEN
ERGOAX
Publication Date
20111101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
nussbaum@vt.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008504
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0014-0139
Source Name
Ergonomics
State
VA
Performing Organization
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
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