Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Postpartum depressive symptoms and the combined load of paid and unpaid work: a longitudinal analysis.

Authors
Dagher-RK; McGovern-PM; Dowd-BE; Lundberg-U
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2011 Oct; 84(7):735-743
NIOSHTIC No.
20040227
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of total workload and other work-related factors on postpartum depression in the first 6 months after childbirth, utilizing a hybrid model of health and workforce participation. METHODS: We utilized data from the Maternal Postpartum Health Study collected in 2001 from a prospective cohort of 817 employed women who delivered in three community hospitals in Minnesota. Interviewers collected data at enrollment and 5 weeks, 11 weeks, and 6 months after childbirth. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale measured postpartum depression. Independent variables included total workload (paid and unpaid work), job flexibility, supervisor and coworker support, available social support, job satisfaction, infant sleep problems, infant irritable temperament, and breastfeeding. RESULTS: Total average daily workload increased from 14.4 h (6.8 h of paid work; 7.1% working at 5 weeks postpartum) to 15.0 h (7.9 h of paid work; 87% working at 6 months postpartum) over the 6 months. Fixed effects regression analyses showed worse depression scores were associated with higher total workload, lower job flexibility, lower social support, an infant with sleep problems, and breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: Working mothers of reproductive years may find the study results valuable as they consider merging their work and parenting roles after childbirth. Future studies should examine the specific mechanisms through which total workload affects postpartum depressive symptoms.
Keywords
Humans; Women; Pregnancy; Psychological-effects; Psychological-stress; Workers; Work-performance; Work-environment; Epidemiology; Workplace-studies; Statistical-analysis; Age-groups; Author Keywords: Total workload; Postpartum depression; Occupational health; Maternal health
Contact
R. K. Dagher, Department of Health Services Administration, University of Maryland, 3310B School of Public Health Building, College Park, MD 20742
CODEN
IAEHDW
Publication Date
20111001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
rdagher1@umd.edu
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R18-OH-003605
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0340-0131
Source Name
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
State
MD; MN
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
TOP