Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Glutathione enzyme and selenoprotein polymorphisms associate with mercury biomarker levels in Michigan dental professionals.

Authors
Goodrich-JM; Wang-Y; Gillespie-B; Werner-R; Franzblau-A; Basu-N
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2011 Dec; 257(2):301-308
NIOSHTIC No.
20040175
Abstract
Mercury is a potent toxicant of concern to both the general public and occupationally exposed workers (e.g., dentists). Recent studies suggest that several genes mediating the toxicokinetics of mercury are polymorphic in humans and may influence inter-individual variability in mercury accumulation. This work hypothesizes that polymorphisms in key glutathione synthesizing enzyme, glutathione S-transferase, and selenoprotein genes underlie inter-individual differences in mercury body burden as assessed by analytical mercury measurement in urine and hair, biomarkers of elemental mercury and methylmercury, respectively. Urine and hair samples were collected from a population of dental professionals (n = 515), and total mercury content was measured. Average urine (1.06 +/- 1.24 microg/L) and hair mercury levels (0.49 +/- 0.63 microg/g) were similar to national U.S. population averages. Taqman assays were used to genotype DNA from buccal swab samples at 15 polymorphic sites in genes implicated in mercury metabolism. Linear regression modeling assessed the ability of polymorphisms to modify the relationship between mercury biomarker levels and exposure sources (e.g., amalgams, fish consumption). Five polymorphisms were significantly associated with urine mercury levels (GSTT1 deletion), hair mercury levels (GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, GSS 5'), or both (SEPP1 3'UTR). Overall, this study suggests that polymorphisms in selenoproteins and glutathione-related genes may influence elimination of mercury in the urine and hair or mercury retention following exposures to elemental mercury (via dental amalgams) and methylmercury (via fish consumption).
Keywords
Health-care; Dental-health; Dentists; Mercury-compounds; Toxic-materials; Biomarkers; Genes; Enzymes; Enzyme-activity; Proteins; Body-burden; Urinalysis; Sampling; Bioassays; Metabolism; Mathematical-models; Measurement-equipment; Biological-effects; Methyl-compounds; Thiols; Peptides; Genetic-factors; Author Keywords: Elemental mercury; Methylmercury; Polymorphism; Gene-environment; Selenoprotein; Glutathione s-transferase
Contact
Niladri Basu, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
CODEN
TXAPA9
CAS No.
7439-97-6; 70-18-8; 22967-92-6
Publication Date
20111201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
niladri@umich.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008455
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0041-008X
Source Name
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
State
MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
TOP