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Proposed modification to the inhalable aerosol convention applicable to realistic workplace wind speeds.

Authors
Sleeth-DK; Vincent-JH
Source
Ann Occup Hyg 2011 Jun; 55(5):476-484
NIOSHTIC No.
20040149
Abstract
The current convention for sampling inhalable aerosols was based on several mannequin studies performed in wind tunnels at wind speeds between 0.5 and 4 m s(-1). In reality, as we now know, the wind speed in most modern indoor working environments is generally at or below ~0.2 m s(-1). Inhalability studies performed in calm air aerosol chambers have shown that human aspiration efficiency at essentially zero wind speed is not consistent with the existing inhalable aerosol convention, calling into question the universal applicability of the current standard. More recently, experiments were carried out in a new hybrid wind tunnel-calm air chamber at more representative workplace wind speeds, between ~0.1 and 0.5 m s(-1), to fill in this knowledge gap. Comparing these new data to both the existing inhalable aerosol convention and a recently proposed alternative for low wind movement suggests that, while the existing inhalable aerosol convention remains appropriate for wind speeds above ~0.2 m s(-1), the modified version is more appropriate for the range below ~0.2 m s(-1).
Keywords
Aerosol-sampling; Air-sampling; Sampling; Sampling-methods; Inhalants; Air-flow; Particle-aerodynamics; Breathing; Inhalation-studies; Exposure-chambers; Standards; Work-environment; Respiration; Respiratory-rate; Aerosols; Environmental-factors; Monitoring-systems; Author Keywords: aerosols; aspiration efficiency; inhalability; inhalable convention; low wind speed
Contact
Darrah K. Sleeth, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Family and Preventative Medicine, University of Utah, 391 Chipeta Way, Suite C, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
CODEN
AOHYA3
Publication Date
20110601
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
darrah.sleeth@hsc.utah.edu
Funding Amount
697800
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-002987; B01182012
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0003-4878
Priority Area
Pulmonary System Disorders
Source Name
Annals of Occupational Hygiene
State
UT; MI
Performing Organization
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
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