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Joint inflammation and early degeneration induced by high-force reaching are attenuated by ibuprofen in an animal model of work-related musculoskeletal disorder.

Authors
Driban-JB; Barr-AE; Amin-M; Sitler-MR; Barbe-MF
Source
J Biomed Biotechnol 2011 Mar; 2011:691412
NIOSHTIC No.
20039050
Abstract
We used our voluntary rat model of reaching and grasping to study the effect of performing a high-repetition and high-force (HRHF) task for 12 weeks on wrist joints. We also studied the effectiveness of ibuprofen, administered in the last 8 weeks, in attenuating HRHF-induced changes in these joints. With HRHF task performance, ED1+ and COX2+ cells were present in subchondral radius, carpal bones and synovium; IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha increased in distal radius/ulna/carpal bones; chondrocytes stained with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase- (TDT-) mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) increased in wrist articular cartilages; superficial structural changes (e.g., pannus) and reduced proteoglycan staining were observed in wrist articular cartilages. These changes were not present in normal controls or ibuprofen treated rats, although IL-1alpha was increased in reach limbs of trained controls. HRHF-induced increases in serum C1,2C (a biomarker of collagen I and II degradation), and the ratio of collagen degradation to synthesis (C1,2C/CPII; the latter a biomarker of collage type II synthesis) were also attenuated by ibuprofen. Thus, ibuprofen treatment was effective in attenuating HRHF-induced inflammation and early articular cartilage degeneration.
Keywords
Animal-studies; Biological-effects; Biological-monitoring; Biomarkers; Carpal-tunnel-syndrome; Cellular-reactions; Cumulative-trauma; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Ergonomics; Histopathology; Injuries; Laboratory-animals; Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Repetitive-work; Skeletal-movement; Skeletal-stress; Skeletal-system; Skeletal-system-disorders; Tissue-disorders
Contact
Mary F. Barbe, Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Temple University School of Medicine, 3500 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140
CODEN
JBBOAJ
Publication Date
20110303
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mbarbe@temple.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003970
ISSN
1110-7243
Source Name
Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
State
PA; MA; OR
Performing Organization
Temple University
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