Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Gasoline additives and public health.

Authors
Erdal-S
Source
Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 2: Ec-Ge. Cleveland CJ, Ayres, RU, Costanza R, Goldemberg J, Ilic M, Jochem E, Kaufmann R, Lovins A, Munasinghe M, Pachauri R, Pardo C, Peterson P, Schipper L, Slade M, Smil V, Worrell E, eds., Boston, MA: Elsevier Academic Press, 2004 Jan; 2:821-830
NIOSHTIC No.
20038999
Abstract
Since 1979, oxygenates as gasoline additives have been used in limited areas of the United States as octane enhancers to replace lead at levels around 2 to 8% by volume. During the 1980s, oxygenates came into wider use as some states implemented oxygenated gasoline programs for the control of carbon monoxide air pollution in cold winter. Oxygenates were added to conventional gasoline nationally at higher percentages with the passage of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), which required that oxygenates be added either seasonally (15% MTBE by volume) or year-round (11% MTBE by volume) to gasoline in specific parts of the country where carbon monoxide in the winter or concentrations of ozone in the summer exceed their respective National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).
Keywords
Gas-mixtures; Air-quality; Lead-fumes; Gas-industry; Environmental-pollution; Environmental-health
Publication Date
20040101
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Editors
Cleveland-CJ; Ayres-RU; Costanza-R; Goldemberg-J; Ilic-M; Jochem-E; Kaufmann-R; Lovins-A; Munasinghe-M; Pachauri-R; Pardo-C; Peterson-P; Schipper-L; Slade-M; Smil-V; Worrell-E
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780121764821
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008672
Source Name
Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 2: Ec-Ge
State
IL
Performing Organization
University of Illinois-Chicago
TOP