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Adjusting tapered element oscillating microbalance data for comparison with Federal Reference Method PM2.5 measurements in region 5.

Authors
Rizzo-M; Scheff-PA; Kaldy-W
Source
J Air Waste Manage Assoc 2003 May; 53(5):596-607
NIOSHTIC No.
20038989
Abstract
Continuous monitoring of particulate matter (PM) with a diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) is quickly gaining acceptance as an alternative means of measuring fine PM in the United States. For this project, data were taken from all monitoring sites within Region 5 that used the tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) for PM2.5 and had a collocated Federal Reference Method (FRM) monitor. Scatter plots of TEOM versus FRM show that for a significant fraction of the observations, an independent factor causes the TEOM to underestimate the FRM value. This underestimation appears to increase as temperature decreases. For this analysis, a linear relationship was fit to the TEOM versus FRM data, allowing a break or knot in the relationship, modeled as a change of slope, at a site-specific temperature. To test whether the models are adequate for adjusting future measurements, models were also developed using the first year of data only, and the remaining observations were used to test the durability of the relationships. For all but one monitor in Minnesota, the models developed for each site had consistently high R2s, were predictive of future measurements, and could be used to derive "FRM-like" results from the TEOM measurements. The temperature knots fitted by the model for individual sites ranged from 12.9 to 20.6 degrees C. Data from all six sites in the state of Michigan were also combined to determine if a single model could be developed for the entire state. While the single model for the state of Michigan worked reasonably well, some of the predicted concentrations at individual sites were systematically underestimating the observed concentrations on more polluted days. The same conclusion was drawn for a Region 5-wide model. This approach was also found to work very well for six individual TEOM monitors in New York State.
Keywords
Particulates; Exposure-levels; Exposure-assessment; Pollutants; Pollution; Air-quality; Air-sampling; Airborne-particles; Temperature-effects; Models; Analytical-processes
Contact
Dr. Peter A. Scheff, School of Public Health (M/C 922), University of Illinois, 2121 West Taylor Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612
CODEN
AIWAE2
Publication Date
20030501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
pscheff@uic.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008672
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1096-2247
Source Name
Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association
State
IL; MI; MN; NY; OH; WI
Performing Organization
University of Illinois-Chicago
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