Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Work hours, sleep sufficiency, and prevalence of depression among full-time employees: a community-based cross-sectional study [CME].

Authors
Nakata-A
Source
J Clin Psychiatry 2011 May; 72(5):605-614
NIOSHTIC No.
20038926
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Depression due to long work hours and sleep deprivation is a major occupational health concern. The extent to which work hours and sleep are associated with depression was investigated in employees of small- and medium-scale businesses in the Japanese city of Yashio, Saitama, and in the Ohta ward of Tokyo, a suburb of Tokyo, controlling for various potential confounders. METHOD: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 2,643 full-time employees (1,928 men and 715 women), aged 18-79 years (mean = 45 years), in 296 small- and medium-scale businesses were surveyed from August 2002 to December 2002 using a self-administered questionnaire evaluating work hours, sleep status, and covariates including sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, biological factors, medication usage, and occupational factors. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Prevalence of depression by work hours, sleep status, and covariates was analyzed by X2 test. Risk of depression by work hours, sleep status, and both combined was estimated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Participants working greater than 10 hours per day, sleeping less than 6 hours per day, and reporting insufficient sleep were, respectively, 37 percent, 43 percent, and 97 percent more likely to be depressed than those working 6 to 8 hours per day, sleeping 6 to less than 8 hours per day, and reporting sufficient sleep (P less than .05). Participants working greater than 10 hours per day or greater than 8 to 10 hours per day with less than 6 hours per day of sleep showed a 41 percent-169 percent higher prevalence of depression versus those working 6 to 8 hours per day with 6-plus hours per day of sleep (P less than .05). Participants reporting insufficient sleep in 3 work-hour categories (6 to 8, greater than 8 to 10, and greater than 10 hours per day) showed a 62 percent-179 percent increase in the prevalence of depression versus those working 6 to 8 hours per day and reporting sufficient sleep (P less than .05). No significant effects on depression were found for subjects in any work-hour category with 6-plus hours of sleep or with subjective sufficient sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Depression associated with long work hours is primarily a result of sleep deprivation. Greater attention should be paid to management of sleep deprivation to prevent workplace depression.
Keywords
Sleep-deprivation; Shift-work; Shift-workers; Work-analysis; Work-intervals; Worker-health; Sleep-disorders; Mental-disorders; Mental-health; Health-surveys; Questionnaires; Emotional-stress; Employee-health; Job-stress; Sociological-factors; Demographic-characteristics; Behavior; Behavior-patterns; Attitude; Psychological-factors; Psychological-responses; Biological-factors; Drugs; Risk-factors; Mathematical-models
Contact
Akinori Nakata, PhD, Division of Applied Research and Technology, MS-C24, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
CODEN
JCLPDE
Publication Date
20110501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
cji5@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0160-6689
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Services
Source Name
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
State
OH
TOP