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Utilization of respirators by naive subjects.

Authors
Bansal-S; Santiago-S; Liu-D; Yun-D; Ng-D; Liu-Y; Harber-P
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2008 Apr; 177(Meeting Abstracts):A314
NIOSHTIC No.
20038911
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess tolerance and proper utilization of respirators by naive users (e.g., for threat of epidemic or terrorist activity). METHODS: We studied 31 subjects (23 with mild respiratory impairment) in an exercise laboratory and 8 simulated "real-life" tasks including sedentary (S) and active (A) tasks. Measurements included ventilatory parameters via inductive plethysmograph, 12 Borg scale subjective ratings, and video recording of proper use. Subjects used half mask (HFM) and N95respirators. RESULTS: Tables illustrate results for a sedentary (e.g., sorting) and active (e.g., carry 8 pound load) tasks for HFM and N95. Mixed effect regression showed significant effects of both task and mask on comfort scales; HFM had more adverse impact than N95. Respiratory comfort scales were affected more than functional scales such as speech & hearing. Moderate exertion produced more discomfort than sedentary tasks. Minute ventilation corresponded to activity level and was not significantly affected by mask type. Although subjects received minimal instruction, video analysis showed they rarely attempted to dislodge the mask regardless of the task or mask type. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: Respirator use may be a feasible alternative to "shelter in place/don't work" responses to a perceived public health threat. Greater caution is needed for tasks requiring higher exertion levels or more complex masks. The overall level of protection of the public may be greater with an N95 than a HFM because of its better tolerance and greater ease of use.
Keywords
Face-masks; Personal-protection; Personal-protective-equipment; Physical-stress; Protective-equipment; Protective-measures; Quantitative-analysis; Respirators; Respiratory-equipment; Respiratory-protective-equipment; Risk-analysis; Statistical-analysis; Task-performance
CODEN
AJCMED
Publication Date
20080401
Document Type
Abstract
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008119
ISSN
1073-449X
Source Name
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California, Los Angeles
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