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Environmental chemical exposure may augment occupational asthma.

Authors
Anderson-SE; Franko-J; Beezhold-D; Meade-BJ
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Feb; 127(2)(Suppl. 1):AB177
NIOSHTIC No.
20038859
Abstract
RATIONALE: During the past several decades there has been a remarkable and unexplained increase in the prevalence of asthma. Work related asthma has become the most frequently diagnosed occupational respiratory illness accounting for 10-25% of adult asthma. While the hygiene hypothesis provides one potential explanation, individuals in industrial societies are also inadvertently exposed to an increasing number of chemicals. While many chemicals are known to directly induce asthma there is also the potential for non-sensitizing chemicals to augment the immune response induced by other chemical and protein allergens. METHODS: Use a murine model to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of co-exposure to non-sensitizing chemicals with occupationally relevant protein and low molecule weight (LMW) chemical allergens. RESULTS: Dermal application of environmentally relevant chemicals, perflourooctanonic acid (at concentrations up to 1.5%), or di-ethyl phthalate (at concentrations up to 100%) simultaneously with exposure to a protein (ovalbumin) or LMW respiratory (toluene diisocyanate) allergen was found to augment the allergic response to that allergen. Observed changes in mice include elevated total and antigen-specific IgE and IgG1, increased IL-4 and IL-5 production by lung associated lymph nodes, increased airway hyperreactivity, and increased lung eosinophils compared to mice exposed to each allergen alone. CONCLUSIONS: Dermal exposure to environmentally relevant chemicals concurrently with well characterized protein and LMW chemical allergens was demonstrated to augment asthma in an animal model. Understanding the mechanisms by which mixed exposures influence and augment asthma and asthma-like symptoms may lead to better prevention strategies for those at risk for occupational asthma.
Keywords
Respiratory-system-disorders; Bronchial-asthma; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Lung-disorders; Industrial-emissions; Industrial-exposures; Immune-reaction; Allergens; Protein-chemistry; Proteins; Skin-exposure; Synergism; Antigens; Lymph-nodes; Airway-resistance; Laboratory-animals; Laboratory-testing; Exposure-assessment; Lung-irritants; Molecular-structure; Chemical-properties
CODEN
JACIBY
CAS No.
335-67-1; 84-66-2; 584-84-9
Publication Date
20110201
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0091-6749
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
State
WV
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