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Acute decrease in HDL cholesterol associated with exposure to welding fumes.

Authors
Rice-MB; Cavallari-J; Fang-S; Christiani-D
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2011 Jan; 53(1):17-21
NIOSHTIC No.
20038766
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate acute changes in circulating lipids after exposure to relatively high levels of particulate matter through welding. METHODS: Using a repeated measures panel study, lipid levels before and after welding and personal exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were measured in 36 male welders over 63 exposure and/or control days. RESULTS: There was a trend toward decrease in HDL (-2.3 mg/dL, P = 0.08) 18 hours after welding. This effect became significant (-2.6 mg/dL, P = 0.05) after adjustment for possible confounders. The effect was strongest (-4.3 mg/dL, P = 0.02) among welders who did not weld the day before the study. There were no significant changes in other lipids associated with welding or PM2.5 exposure. CONCLUSION: Welding exposure was associated with an acute decrease in circulating HDL, which may relate to the inflammatory and proatherosclerotic effects of fine particle exposure.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-workers; Welders; Welding; Welding-equipment; Fumes; Particulates; Lipids; Biological-monitoring; Men; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-levels; Metal-compounds; Metal-fumes
Contact
Mary Berlik Rice, MD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Bulfinch, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St., Boston, MA 02114 USA
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20110101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mrice2@partners.org
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
1076-2752
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
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