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Reaction rates of ozone and terpenes adsorbed to model indoor surfaces.

Authors
Springs-M; Wells-JR; Morrison-GC
Source
Indoor Air 2011 Aug; 21(4):319-327
NIOSHTIC No.
20038694
Abstract
Reaction rates and reaction probabilities have been quantified on model indoor surfaces for the reaction of ozone with two monoterpenes (Delta3-carene and d-limonene). Molar surface loadings were obtained by performing breakthrough experiments in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) packed with beads of glass, polyvinylchloride or zirconium silicate. Reaction rates and probabilities were determined by equilibrating the PFR with both the terpene and the ozone and measuring the ozone consumption rate. To mimic typical indoor conditions, temperatures of 20, 25, and 30 degrees C were used in both types of experiments along with a relative humidity ranging from 10% to 80%. The molar surface loading decreased with increased relative humidity, especially on glass, suggesting that water competed with the terpenes for adsorption sites. The ozone reactivity experiments indicate that higher surface loadings correspond with higher ozone uptake. The reaction probability for Delta3-carene with ozone ranged from 2.9 x 10(-6) to 3.0 x 10(-5) while reaction probabilities for d-limonene ranged from 2.8 x 10(-5) to 3.0 x 10(-4). These surface reaction probabilities are roughly 10 - 100 times greater than the corresponding gas-phase values. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially for lower volatility terpenoids.
Keywords
Indoor-environmental-quality; Terpene-compounds; Reaction-rates; Air-flow; Air-monitoring; Temperature-control; Relative-humidity; Surface-properties; Adsorbents; Gas-adsorption; Exposure-assessment; Laboratory-testing; Indoor-air-pollution; Models; Simulation-methods; Author Keywords: Ozone; Terpene; Surface reaction; Reaction probability; Laboratory study
Contact
G. C. Morrison, Missouri University of Science & Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409, USA
CODEN
INAIE5
CAS No.
5989-27-5; 10028-15-6; 13466-78-9
Publication Date
20110801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
gcm@mst.edu
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0905-6947
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Healthcare and Social Assistance; Services
Source Name
Indoor Air
State
MO; WV
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