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Determination of an intensity function for subsidence prediction.

Authors
Triplett-TL; Yurchak-DW
Source
Rock Mechanics: Contributions and Challenges: Proceedings of the 31st U.S. Symposium, June 18-20, 1990, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado. Hustrulid WA, Johnson GA, ed., Brookfield, VT: A.A. Balkema, 1990 Jan; :169-175
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20038676
Abstract
Subsidence persists as a problem for coal mine operators in the US, compelling the creation of programs to repair or prevent damages to farmland and surface structures. To insure the coexistence of profitable coal mining and desired surface activities, it is important that possible subsidence damages be minimized or prevented. However, the first requirement for the development and implementation of reasonable damage reduction and mitigation techniques is the knowledge of the magnitude of the displacements imposed by the subsidence event. Most importantly, findings by Kane et al (1988) suggest that the curvature of the displacement profile must be accurately predicted. Because of the difficulty which persists in appropriately characterizing rock mass properties for use in analytical techniques, the empirical profile function and influence function methods are more widely used for subsidence prediction. Since the shape of the subsidence curve predicted by a profile function is limited by the form of that function, the influence function approach seems to offer the greatest potential for accurately predicting mining subsidence for various conditions. Therefore, the objective of this research, conducted by the Bureau of Mines, is to review and modify the influence function method to predict mining subsidence in Illinois. If subsidence on the surface is considered the effect, and an extraction at mine level is considered a cause of certain intensity, this work has determined that the technique must incorporate an intensity field to represent the magnitudes of these causes. This paper shows that the inclusion of a reasonable intensity field increases the accuracy of the technique.
Keywords
Mining-industry; Coal-mining; Ground-control; Ground-stability; Mathematical-models; Computer-models; Surface-properties; Analytical-models
Publication Date
19900101
Document Type
OP; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Hustrulid-WA; Johnson-GA
Fiscal Year
1990
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9789061911234
NIOSH Division
TCRC
Source Name
Rock Mechanics: Contributions and Challenges: Proceedings of the 31st U.S. Symposium, June 18-20, 1990, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado
State
MN; CO
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