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Lung tumor production and tissue metal distribution after exposure to manual metal ARC-stainless steel welding fume in A/J and C57BL/6J mice.

Authors
Zeidler-Erdely-PC; Battelli-LA; Salmen-Muniz-R; Li-Z; Erdely-A; Kashon-ML; Simeonova-PP; Antonini-JM
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health, A 2011 May; 74(11):728-736
NIOSHTIC No.
20038635
Abstract
Stainless steel welding produces fumes that contain carcinogenic metals. Therefore, welders may be at risk for the development of lung cancer, but animal data are inadequate in this regard. Our main objective was to examine lung tumor production and histopathological alterations in lung-tumor-susceptible (A/J) and -resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice exposed to manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fume. Male mice were exposed to vehicle or MMA-SS welding fume (20 mg/kg) by pharyngeal aspiration once per month for 4 mo. At 78 wk postexposure, gross tumor counts and histopathological changes were assessed and metal analysis was done on extrapulmonary tissue (aorta, heart, kidney, and liver). At 78 wk postexposure, gross lung tumor multiplicity and incidence were unremarkable in mice exposed to MMA-SS welding fume. Histopathology revealed that only the exposed A/J mice contained minimal amounts of MMA-SS welding fume in the lung and statistically increased lymphoid infiltrates and alveolar macrophages. A significant increase in tumor multiplicity in the A/J strain was observed at 78 wk. Metal analysis of extrapulmonary tissue showed that only the MMA-SS-exposed A/J mice had elevated levels of Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn in kidney and Cr in liver. In conclusion, this study further supports that MMA-SS welding fume does not produce a significant tumorigenic response in an animal model, but may induce a chronic lung immune response. In addition, long-term extrapulmonary tissue alterations in metals in the susceptible A/J mouse suggest that the adverse effects of this fume might be cumulative.
Keywords
Welding; Fumes; Stainless-steel; Carcinogens; Metal-compounds; Metal-fumes; Heavy-metals; Laboratory-animals; Animal-studies; Lung-cancer; Welders; Tumors; Arc-welders; Arc-welding; Exposure-assessment; Exposure-methods; Alveolar-cells; Chromium-compounds; Copper-compounds; Manganese-compounds; Zinc-compounds; Kidneys; Liver; Immune-reaction
Contact
Patti C. Zeidler-Erdely, PhD, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Health Effects Laboratory Division, 1095 Willowdale Road (M/S L2015), Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
CODEN
JTEHD6
CAS No.
7440-47-3; 7440-50-8; 7439-96-5; 7440-66-6
Publication Date
20110501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
PErdely@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1528-7394
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues
State
WV; DC
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