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Application of EPA CMB8.2 model for source apportionment of sediment PAHs in Lake Calumet, Chicago.

Authors
Li-A; Jang-JK; Scheff-P
Source
Environ Sci Technol 2003 May; 37(13):2958-2965
NIOSHTIC No.
20038510
Abstract
A chemical mass balance model developed by the U.S. EPA, CMB8.2, was used to apportion the major sources of PAHs found in the sediments of Lake Calumet and surrounding wetlands in southeast Chicago. The results indicate the feasibility of applying CMB8.2 to pollutants found in aquatic sediments. To establish the fingerprints of PAH sources, 28 source profiles were collected from the literature. Some of the source profiles were modified based on the gas/particle partitioning of individual PAHs. The profiles under the same source category were averaged, and the fingerprints of six sources were established, including coke oven, residential coal burning, coal combustion in power generation, gasoline engine exhaust, diesel engine exhaust, and traffic tunnel air. Nine model operations with a total of 422 runs were made, differing in the choice of fitting species and the sources involved. Modeling results indicate that coke ovens and traffic are the two major sources of PAHs in the area. For traffic sources, either traffic tunnel alone or both diesel and gasoline engine exhausts were entered into the model. These two groups of model operations produced comparable results with regard to the PAH contributions from road traffic. Although the steel industries have shrunk in recent years, closed and still-active coke plants continue to contribute significantly to the PAH loadings. Overall, the average contribution from coke oven emissions calculated by different operations ranges from 21% to 53% of all sources, and that from traffic ranges from 27% to 63%. The pattern of source contributions shows spatial and temporal variations.
Keywords
Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Gases; Particulates; Exhaust-gases; Coke-oven-emissions; Diesel-emissions
Contact
Li, A, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2121 West Taylor Street, MC-922, Chicago, Illinois 60612-7260
CODEN
ESTHAG
Publication Date
20030501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
anli@uic.edu.
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008672
Issue of Publication
13
ISSN
0013-936X
Source Name
Environmental Science and Technology
State
IL
Performing Organization
University of Illinois-Chicago
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