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Health hazard evaluation report: knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding influenza vaccination among employees at child care centers - Ohio.

Authors
de Perio-MA; Wiegand-DM; Evans-SM
Source
Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, HETA 2010-0025-3121, 2011 Feb; :1-43
NIOSHTIC No.
20038349
Abstract
In November 2009, NIOSH received a technical assistance request from the Department of Jobs and Family Services at an Ohio county. The request asked for NIOSH assistance in examining rates of pH1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccination and in assessing knowledge of and attitudes towards these two vaccines among employees at licensed child care centers in the county. We performed a cross-sectional survey among employees of 32 randomly selected licensed child care centers. From January 30-March 1, 2010, we surveyed employees about personal and work characteristics, pertinent medical history, receipt of or intention to receive the pH1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines, and knowledge about and attitudes towards each vaccine. Of 403 invited child care employees, 384 (95%) completed a survey. Forty-five (12%) respondents reported having received the pH1N1 vaccine. Eighty-five (22%) respondents reported having received the seasonal influenza vaccine. The most common reason for receiving either vaccine was to protect oneself or one's family. For both vaccines, among unvaccinated respondents, 19% reported that they intended to get the vaccine, and 81% reported that they did not intend to do so. The most common reasons cited for not intending to receive either vaccine were: "I don't think the vaccine will keep me from getting the flu" and "I don't think I need the vaccine." Respondents who cared for toddlers or children 13 months-3 years, had some college or higher as the highest level of education, had positive attitudes towards the vaccine, felt external pressure from others to get the vaccine, and felt personal control over whether or not to get the vaccine were more likely to have received the pH1N1 vaccine than those who did not have these characteristics. Respondents who believed in the efficacy of the vaccine, had positive attitudes towards the vaccine, felt external pressure from others to get the vaccine, and felt personal control over whether or not to get the vaccine were more likely to have received the seasonal influenza vaccine than those who did not have these characteristics. We found that employees at child care centers in the county had low rates of pH1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccination. Misconceptions about the need for the vaccines and the efficacy and safety of the vaccines were the most common reasons cited for not receiving either vaccine. Vaccination remains the most effective method to prevent influenza, which can cause lost work time, serious illness, and death. Annual influenza vaccination of all persons aged > / = 6 months is now recommended for the 2010-2011 influenza season. We recommend that efforts to improve vaccination rates among child care providers include notification of vaccination campaigns through media and public health messages addressing the most frequent antivaccination ideas. Educational interventions in the form of training that focuses on child care providers' risk for infection, the efficacy and safety profile of the vaccine, and providers' responsibility to get vaccinated should also be considered for this group. Employers should consider requiring influenza vaccination for their employees as part of a comprehensive influenza prevention program. If this is not feasible, then employers should encourage employees to get the vaccine.
Keywords
Region-5; Infectious-diseases; Infection-control; Viral-diseases; Viral-infections; Health-surveys; Child-care-workers; Vaccines; Seasonal-factors; Group-behavior; Attitude; Employee-health; Employees; Positive-feedback; Education; Training; Disease-control; Disease-prevention; Author Keywords: influenza; vaccination; child care; H1N1; pandemic; infection
Publication Date
20110201
Document Type
Field Studies; Hazard Evaluation and Technical Assistance
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
PB2011-105250
NTIS Price
A05
Identifying No.
HETA-2010-0025-3121
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Services
SIC Code
NAICS-624410
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
OH
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