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Firefighters' physiological responses to boot weight and sole flexibility during ladder climbing and obstacle crossing.

Authors
Turner-NL; Chiou-S; Zwiener-J; Weaver-D; Haskell-W
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc 2010 May; 42(5)(Suppl 1):166
NIOSHTIC No.
20038327
Abstract
Firefighter boots may be composed of rubber, lighter leather, or ultralight fabric. Boot soles can be stitched (less flexible) or cemented or bonded (more flexible). A five to 12% increase in oxygen consumption per kg of weight added to the foot has been observed; however, this increase may depend on boot weight and sole type. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of fabric/stitched sole (FS), leather/stitched sole (LS), leather/cement sole (LF) and rubber/bonded sole (RF) boots on firefighters' metabolic and respiratory variables during simulated firefighting tasks. METHODS: Fourteen women and 14 men, wearing full turnout clothing and equipment and one of four pairs of boots, climbed up and down a 3.7-m ladder for five minutes at 25 rungs per minute and then walked for five minutes at 0.57 mĚsec-1 while stepping over four obstacles and carrying a 9.5-kg hose. Minute ventilation (VE), oxygen consumption (VO2 and VO2/kg), CO2 production (VCO2), and heart rate (HR) were measured, and minute-five data were used for analysis. Comparisons of boot weight and sole type were made using ANOVA with repeated measures. RESULTS: During ladder climbing, boot weight had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on VE, VO2 and VCO2 (*). There were significant effects (P < 0.05) of both boot weight and sole type for VO2/kg (**). During obstacle crossing, boot weight had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on VE, VO2 and VO2/kg (*). There were significant effects (P < 0.05) of both boot weight and sole type for VCO2 (**). CONCLUSION: There were significant effects of boot weight (4 - 6% increases per kg increase in boot weight) during both ladder climbing and obstacle crossing, which were mitigated by sole type for VO2/kg (2% decrease, ladder climbing) and VCO2 (6% decrease, obstacle crossing).
Keywords
Fire-fighters; Fire-fighting-equipment; Physical-capacity; Physiological-fatigue; Physiological-factors; Humans; Men; Women; Safety-clothing; Heart-rate; Ventilation
CODEN
MSPEDA
Publication Date
20100501
Document Type
Abstract
Email Address
NTurner@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0195-9131
NIOSH Division
NPPTL
Source Name
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
State
PA; WV
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