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Genetic susceptibility and the setting of occupational health standards.

Authors
Schulte-P; Howard-J
Source
Annu Rev Public Health 2011 Apr; 32:149-159
NIOSHTIC No.
20038251
Abstract
As more is learned about genetic susceptibility to occupational and environmental hazards, there will be increasing pressure to use genetic susceptibility information in setting occupational health standards. Historically, this has not been done, but a growing body of research assesses inherited genetic factors as modifiers of the effects of hazardous exposures. Additionally, acquired genetic and epigenetic characteristics could also be used in standard setting. However, for both inherited and acquired genetic characteristics, many scientific ethical, legal, and social issues could arise. Investigators need to examine the potential role and implications of using genetic information in standard setting. In this review, we focus primarily on inherited genetic factors and their role in occupational health standard setting.
Keywords
Genetics; Genetic-factors; Genetic-disorders; Occupational-hazards; Environmental-hazards; Standards; Occupational-health; Health-standards; Risk-analysis; Author Keywords: genetics; risk-assessment; regulation
Contact
Paul Schulte, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
AREHDT
Publication Date
20110401
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
PSchulte@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
0163-7525
NIOSH Division
EID; OD
Source Name
Annual Review of Public Health
State
OH; DC
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