Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Some unique characteristics of ethnic conflict and their implications for managing the conflict.

Authors
Worchel-S
Source
The Psychology of Ethnic and Cultural Conflict. Lee YT, McCauley C, Moghaddam F, Worchel S, eds., Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004 Mar; :289-306
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20038198
Abstract
I recently observed a group of children playing a game called Rip van Winkle in a park. The rules of the game required one participant to pretend that he or she had fallen asleep and awoken 50 years later. The young Rip would then tell the others how they and their neighborhood had changed during that period. I thought about that game several times over the next few weeks, wondering how my own world had changed over the last 50 years. After determining that I had not aged at all, I decided that the world of today had changed in nearly every aspect compared with that in the early 1950s. Methods of communication, modes of travel, the treatment of illness, and even the geographical maps of countries have undergone dramatic transformation. The slumbering Rip van Winkle would face a whole new vocabulary that included PCs, DVDs, emails, AIDS, and IRAs. He would run into young aliens with purple hair, earrings in their navel (or other unmentionable body parts), and tattoos creeping down their backs. But Rip could take comfort that one aspect of the world had not changed. People in various parts of the world are still excluding or killing others because of their ethnicity. Indeed, Arab and Jew, Serb and Croat, and Greek and Turk are keeping the flame of ethnic hatred burning. The Kurds still search for a homeland. Incidents of racial violence can still be found in the United States. Ethnic and tribal warfare grip central Africa and deadly disputes paint the horizons in South Asia. Indigenous peoples in North America, New Zealand, and Australia, who once quietly accepted their place at the bottom of the social barrel, have awoken to claim land and rights that were taken from them.
Keywords
Group-dynamics; Behavior-patterns; Emotional-stress; Sociological-factors; Sociology; Psychological-factors; Psychological-reactions; Psychological-responses
Publication Date
20040330
Document Type
Book or book chapter
Email Address
worchel@hawaii.edu
Editors
Lee-YT; McCauley-C; Moghaddam-F; Worchel-S
Funding Amount
128800
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2004
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780275979836
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T02-OH-008627
Source Name
The Psychology of Ethnic and Cultural Conflict
State
HI; CT
Performing Organization
University of Hawaii at Hilo
TOP