Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Sharpless surgery: a prospective study of the feasibility of performing operations using non-sharp techniques in an urban, university-based surgical practice.

Authors
Makary-MA; Pronovost-PJ; Weiss-ES; Millman-EA; Chang-D; Baker-SP; Cornwell-EE 3rd; Syin-D; Freischlag-JA
Source
World J Surg 2006 Jul; 30(7):1224-1229
NIOSHTIC No.
20037868
Abstract
CONTEXT: Percutaneous injuries occur frequently during surgical procedures and represent a significant occupational hazard to operating room personnel. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility of performing select general surgical procedures using a combination of non-sharp devices and techniques to replace the conventional use of scalpels and needles. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Candidate procedures for which sharpless techniques could replace conventional scalpels and suture needles were identified preoperatively in an urban, university-based general surgical practice over a 1-year period (June 2003-June 2004). Non-sharp techniques included monomeric 2-octyl cyanoacrylate adhesive, electrocautery, tissue stapler, and minimally invasive instrumentation. Conventional scalpels and suture needles were readily available and used whenever necessary. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We rated the feasibility of performing specific procedures without sharps. We also documented the rate of overall reversion to sharps during operations on patients that had been identified preoperatively as candidates for sharpless surgery. RESULTS: Of 358 procedures performed in the general surgery university practice, 91 were identified preoperatively as appropriate for sharpless surgery. Of these, 86.8% (79/91) were completed without the use of sharps, including 13/22 (59.1%) open laparotomy procedures, 20/22 (90.9%) laparoscopic procedures, and 46/47 (97.8%) soft tissue procedures. Intraoperative reversion to sharps occurred in 12 cases when deemed necessary by the surgeon. CONCLUSIONS: Select common procedures can be performed entirely with sharpless techniques, eliminating the risk to surgical personnel associated with intraoperative percutaneous injuries.
Keywords
Accidents; Surgery; Needlestick-injuries; Medical-personnel; Doctors; Nurses; Treatment; Infection-control; Humans; Men; Women
Contact
Martin A. Makary, Department of Surgery, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
CODEN
WJSUDI
Publication Date
20060701
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mmakary1@jhmi.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0364-2313
Source Name
World Journal of Surgery
State
MD
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
TOP