Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Fall prevention among apprentice carpenters.

Authors
Kaskutas-V; Dale-AM; Lipscomb-H; Gaal-J; Fuchs-M; Evanoff-B
Source
Scand J Work, Environ & Health 2010 May; 36(3):258-265
NIOSHTIC No.
20037624
Abstract
Objectives: Falls from heights are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the construction industry, especially among inexperienced workers. We surveyed apprentice carpenters to identify individual and organizational factors associated with falls from heights. Methods: We developed a 72-item survey on fall prevention with multiple domains including fall experience, fall-prevention knowledge, risk perceptions, confidence in ability to prevent falls, training experience, and perceptions of the safety climate and crew safety behaviors. We administered the questionnaire to apprentice carpenters in this cross-sectional study. Results: Of the 1025 respondents, 51% knew someone who had fallen from a height at work and 16% had personally fallen in the past year, with ladders accounting for most of the falls. Despite participation in school-based and on-the-job training, fall-prevention knowledge was poor. Ladders were perceived as low risk and ladder training was rare. Apprentices reported high levels of unsafe, fall-related behaviors on their work crews. Apprentices in residential construction were more likely to fall than those in commercial construction, as were apprentices working on crews with fewer senior carpenters to provide mentorship, and those reporting more unsafe behaviors among fellow workers. Conclusions: Despite participation in a formal apprenticeship program, many apprentices work at heights without adequate preparation and subsequently experience falls. Apprenticeship programs can improve the timing and content of fall-prevention training. This study suggests that organizational changes in building practices, mentorship, and safety practices are also necessary to decrease worker falls from heights.
Keywords
Fall-protection; Construction; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Risk-factors; Occupational-accidents; Occupational-hazards; Injuries; Injury-prevention; Workers; Author Keywords: apprentice carpenter; carpenter; case report; construction; construction safety; fall; fall prevention; injury; injury prevention; ladder; prevention; safety and health
Contact
V Kaskutas, Washington University School of Medicine, Program in Occupational Therapy, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
CODEN
SWEHDO
Publication Date
20100501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
kaskutasv@wustl.edu
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Construction
Fiscal Year
2010
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U54-OH-008307
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0355-3140
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
State
MO; NC; MD
Performing Organization
Center to Protect Workers' Rights
TOP