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Associations between body mass indices and surgeries for rotator cuff tendinitis.

Authors
Wendelboe-AM; Hegmann-KT; Gren-LH; Alder-SC; White-GL; Lyon-JL
Source
Am J Epidemiol 2003 Jun; 157(11)(Suppl):S83
NIOSHTIC No.
20037579
Abstract
Rotator cuff tears are the most common tendon ruptures in the body. Rotator cuff related problems are second to lower back as the most costly in many workers' compensation systems. Due to biomechanical and systemic risk factors, we hypothesize that obesity increases the risk of having rotator cuff related surgeries. A frequency matched case-control study in Utahns was conducted in which 311 patients (ages 53-77) who had undergone rotator cuff repair, arthroscopy, and/or other repairs of the shoulder from 1992- 2000 were included. Cases were matched to 1,605 controls, randomly drawn from 10,943 potential controls. Controls were Utah residents enrolled in a large cancer screening trial. Mantel-Haenszel age adjusted odds ratios (OR) stratified on sex were calculated using ICD-9 procedural codes and body mass index (BMI) groups. Regression analyses were also performed. There was an association between increasing BMI and shoulder repair surgery. The highest ORs for both males and females were for those >/= 35.0 kg/m2 (males: OR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.29,7.61; females: OR = 3.51, 95% CI = 1.80, 6.85). Tests for trend were also significant for both genders (males: p = 0.002; females: p < / = 0.001). Regression analysis also indicated a statistically significant association between increasing BMI and shoulder surgery (B = 1.57, 95% CI = 0.97, 2.17, p < / = 0.001). This case-control study demonstrated an association between obesity and shoulder repair surgeries in men and women aged 53-77. By using surgery as proxy for rotator cuff tendinitis, these results suggest that increasing BMI contributes to rotator cuff tendinitis and related conditions in this population.
Keywords
Epidemiology; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Injuries; Biomechanics; Body-weight; Weight-factors; Risk-factors; Surgery; Statistical-analysis; Men; Women; Age-groups
CODEN
AJEPAS
Publication Date
20030601
Document Type
Abstract
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2003
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008414
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0002-9262
Source Name
American Journal of Epidemiology
State
UT
Performing Organization
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
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