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Changes in systolic blood pressure associated with lead in blood and bone.

Authors
Glenn-BS; Bandeen-Roche-K; Lee-BK; Weaver-VM; Todd-AC; Schwartz-BS
Source
Epidemiology 2006 Sep; 17(5):538-544
NIOSHTIC No.
20037541
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Several studies have examined longitudinal associations of blood pressure change or hypertension incidence with lead concentration in blood or bone. It is not clear whether the observed associations reflect an immediate response to lead as a consequence of recent dose or rather are a persistent effect of cumulative dose over a lifetime. METHODS: We followed 575 subjects in a lead-exposed occupational cohort in South Korea between October 1997 and June 2001. We used generalized estimating equation models to evaluate blood pressure change between study visits in relation to tibia lead concentrations at each prior visit and concurrent changes in blood lead. The modeling strategy summarized the longitudinal association of blood pressure with cumulative lead dose or changes in recent lead dose. RESULTS: On average, participants were 41 years old at baseline and had worked 8.5 years in lead-exposed jobs. At baseline, the average +/- standard deviation for blood lead was 31.4 +/- 14.2 microg/dL, and for tibia lead, it was 38.4 +/- 42.9 microg/g bone mineral. Change in systolic blood pressure during the study was associated with concurrent blood lead change, with an average annual increase of 0.9 (95% confidence interval = 0.1 to 1.6) mm Hg for every 10-microg/dL increase in blood lead per year. CONCLUSION: The findings in this relatively young population of current and former lead workers suggest that systolic blood pressure responds to lead dose through acute pathways in addition to the effects of cumulative injury.
Keywords
Lead-absorption; Blood-pressure; Systolic-pressure; Hypertension; Blood-disorders; Bone-disorders; Humans; Exposure-levels; Age-groups
Contact
Barbara S. Glenn, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (8723F), Washington, DC 20460
CODEN
EPIDEY
CAS No.
7439-92-1
Publication Date
20060901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
glenn.barbara@epa.gov
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008428
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1044-3983
Source Name
Epidemiology
State
MD; NY; DC
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University
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